Korkor Kugblenu
by on November 7, 2016
141 views
Sometimes a situation that has gone wrong can be salvaged; other times the best thing to do is to get rid of everything and start afresh. When she was given the permission by her mother to chemically straighten her hair, she had just graduated from Senior Secondary School. It was the most exciting thing to happen to her since turning 18 a few months before. At the salon, she screamed for the hairstylist to wash out the straightening cream after 10 minutes, but it had started burning long before that. The end result was not what she had envisioned. Her hair still looked natural but the hairstylist said she'd had to wait a month before she can try again. Her friends, who had started chemically straightening as far back as Junior Secondary school and even further back, thought she had decided to go for the Afro look. That should been her first sign to stay clear of this painful procedure but being 18, peer pressure wouldn't let her be the only one without a perm. It took three months for her to get the silky, straight look she had always craved. Life should have been peachy after that. But as she would find out time and time again throughout her life, life never stays in the vicinity of our happiness for long. Her beautiful, thick, bouncy silky straight hair started to fall out; Warning sign number 2. Did she pay attention? Of course not! Warning sign number 3; some say, third time's the charm. Her new hairstylist wasn't as attentive as the last one and she didn't rush to wash the straightening out of her hair when she screamed. "It's not cooked," the hairstylist said to our heroine. "Cooked? Is my hair yam? Madam, my scalp is on fire!" But by the time she washed it out, it was too late. The straightening cream and burned a whole right into her scalp. The area became a sore, puss-y mess over the next few days. That was her wake-up call and she heeded. No more chemical straighteners for her. But now what to do with it. There were options - cut it all off and start afresh or let it grow out as she kept braiding. But that would mean using hair extensions and after three years of going through the pain of perm burns and dryer heat, she was done putting strain on her scalp. She had her hair short in secondary school, there's no reason why she couldn't do it again. So she went to the barber shop and cut it all off, right down to her scalp. Coco Chanel once said that a woman who cuts her hair is about to change her life. She never said that the change would include ridicule and backlash from the people you know. Which is exactly what happened. "Grow it and relax it again, oh, you look like village girl", "No one will take you seriously." "You won't do it anymore because it hurts? Beauty is pain, my sister." But she rejected that. "Beauty can be expensive, it can even be hard work, but when pain comes in, I'd rather be your definition of ugly." It came from everyone, especially the people she trusted and soon she regretted her decision. She stared hard at her reflection in the mirror; mentally willing her hair to sprout forth that instant so she could straighten it again. It didn't, of course. But what grew was her confidence. Who is anyone to tell her that what grows naturally out of her head is unattractive, and who is anyone to define unattractive to her. There was no way on this earth she was going to keep straightening her hair when it breaks, and hurts. She wouldn't wait until it all falls out, she'd embrace herself and her natural hair and maybe, she might be a shinning light for others to follow, not because it will become fashionable one day but because she understands the importance of being herself in every way. That kind of confidence is contagious. After 6 months she saw good growth. As she combed through it one morning, she thought, "Oh dear, I had forgotten how tough my natural hair is. What am I going to do with it now?" TO BE CONTINUED
Kume Ozoro
I sincerely haven't read the text yet. It's the feature picture that's holding my gaze. Korkor, your black is beautifuuul:heart_eyes::heart_eyes::heart_eyes::revolving_hearts:
Korkor Kugblenu
I'd say thank you but I had nothing to do with that. Now when you do read the text and you think it's good, that I can take credit for.
Kume Ozoro
Your response made me smile:smiley: I'll be back with something on what you've created here in a moment :smiley::thumbsup:
Korkor Kugblenu
I'm glad it didn't offend you. I may be right about you,
Kume Ozoro
now you've got me wondering what it is you're weighing in that statement *scratches head
Korkor Kugblenu
ha! I have a feeling you'll find out soon enough
Nana Ama
:heart_eyes:
Onyinye Olufunmi Nwangwu
Oh dear. I can relate
Korkor Kugblenu
Tell me your story
Kume Ozoro
why didn't you ever mention that you were this good at spinning a tale? W:heart_eyes:W this is good :ok_hand:
Kume Ozoro
is that you at 22 in the second picture? And I really was looking forward to a photo of you completely bald :disappointed: :smiley:
Korkor Kugblenu
Haha. Not at 22 only 2 years ago. I didn't take a picture at 22. This was my second big chop after my dreadlocks
Kume Ozoro
lol. You still sha look like a kid. You noh fit argue that one comot :laughing:
Korkor Kugblenu
Haha. That I accept, whole heartedly